quilts | Sewing

Seaside Squares Lap Quilt (square in square quilt block tutorial)

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Learn how to make an easy square in square quilt block from a jelly roll with this easy quilt block tutorial!  This Seaside Squares quilt pattern is put together completely with square in square quilt blocks.

Even better? I used a precut jellyroll to make the blocks!  This project comes together very quickly and is a great next-step project for a beginner quilter.  

Learn how to make an easy square in square quilt block from a jelly roll!

New Quilt Block Using a Jelly Roll

I know we are practically into the month of October already and this quilt is more of a summer-themed quilt, but just so you know, I DID start this project back in July with the intention to get the project up on the blog within a few days! 

Unfortunately, I’ve just gotten really slow with completing projects lately.  (I’ve got home building on the mind, lol.)  I do admit though, I did end up creating a few extra problems for myself while making this quilt.

You know that old saying, measure twice, cut once?  Well, I hate to be a know-it-all type person who says this kind of stuff, but this is especially true in quilting too! I took too long of a break when making these quilt blocks, that I had forgotten what size I was supposed to be cutting.

So yes, lots of boo-boos, curses, and seam ripping definitely slowed down the finishing of this project, lol.

Learn how to make an easy square in square quilt block from a jelly roll!

Square in Square Quilt Block Using a Jelly Roll

I basically just came up with this block by playing with jelly roll strips. I have no idea what type of block it might be. I did a bit of google research, but did not see anything similar. the best I could come up with is that it might be some type of framed square, square in square, bento box, etc…

Personally, I like the term square in square, so that’s what I’m going with.

Learn how to make an easy square in square quilt block from a jelly roll!

Since this block is made with a jelly roll, it comes together a bit differently, than the typical square in square, but I like it!  Plus there is a lot less cutting and piecing in this method.

Learn how to make an easy square in square quilt block from a jelly roll!

What is a Jelly Roll?

In case you are not familiar with the phrase Jelly Roll when it comes to quilting or sewing, “Jelly Roll” is the term given by Moda fabrics to collections of 2 1/2″ x 42″ strips of fabric.  They come rolled up in a cute little package and resemble a jelly roll. The best thing about a jelly roll IMO is that you get a small sample of so many different fabrics!

A few tips for this project.

  • I recommend opting for a jelly roll that has two each of the patterns/colors
  • Three strips of fabric ( l used 2 colors and one white) will be sewn together and cut into six 6.5 inch blocks. Then after sewing and cutting those 6.5-inch blocks into half square triangles, if you use a white strip, you will have three white-edged squares and three-patterned squares.
  • So if you want a full block with white edges and a full block with colored edges, you will have to repeat the process with 3 more jelly roll strips
  • I know I just spouted a bunch of gibberish, but I think if you watch the video, you’ll understand what I mean. (The video should have popped up automatically, if not, I added a link to the youtube version at the bottom of the post.)

The jelly roll I am using only has one of each fabric, so I do think I will grab one more to finish it as I don’t want to use the teals in this quilt.

So Many Looks with this pattern!

You can get so many looks with this pattern just by using different fabric patterns and shades.  In this case, I used a jelly roll in a batik pattern very similar shades of blue and green from Joann

Find similar jellyrolls here and here.

Learn how to make an easy square in square quilt block from a jelly roll!

Another version I made with pinks and purples:

seaside squares quilt

As I was putting together this quilt top, I seriously considered sending it out to be professionally quilted.  I’ve never done that before and don’t even know where to start looking. 

Have you ever sent a quilt off (via mail) to be quilted professionally? How was your experience? 

I’m sure there are people that do it locally, but I live kind of far out and am not interested in driving 30 to 45 minutes when I could just package it up and have the mailman pick it up from my house.  My time (and dislike of driving in heavy traffic) is worth more to me than the cost of shipping.

Products used and/or recommended in this quilt block

Learn how to make an easy square in square quilt block from a jelly roll!

Have fun trying this quilt block!

How to make a square in square block with a Jelly Roll:

Materials needed to make the quilt block:

  • Several jelly roll strips  (depends on how many quilt blocks/ how big you want your quilt to be. 6 jelly roll strips will make 3 blocks)
  • Rotary cutter
  • rulers
  • fabric pen
  • basic sewing supplies

Step 1: Organize your Fabric

Separate out your strips of fabric and choose how you want them lined up.

Step 2: Sew the Jelly Roll Strips Together

Sew the Jelly Roll strips together in sets of 3, using a 1/4 inch seam allowance.  Press seams flat.

Step 3. Trim and cut the jellyroll strips into squares

Trim the up edges on one side.

Cut the jelly roll strips into 6.5 inch squares.

Step 4: Make Half Square Triangles with your squares

Line up 2 squares, right sides together and draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on your jelly roll squares.

Sew the two squares together with a straight stitch 1/4 inch on each side of the line.  (a 1/4 inch quilting foot is so handy for this!)

Cut the square in half, along the line you drew.

When opened the new squares look like this:

Press seams flat and trim the extra fabric.

Step 5: Repeat the previous steps at least 6 to 10 more times

You’ll need quite a few more blocks if you want to make a quilt!

Step 6: Decide how you want to arrange your new half square triangle blocks

Decide how you want to arrange your new squares.  Depending on your fabric choices, you can get all sorts of looks.

Step 7: Create the Final Block

Once you have fabric squares lined up how you like

Sew the top two blocks together and then the bottom two blocks with a 1/4 inch seam allowance.

Then line up the two rows and sew them together.  Press seams flat.

Step 8: Sew your blocks together to make a quilt!

Once you have all your blocks assembled, sew the blocks  together to make rows, and then sew the rows together to complete the quilt top

Step 9: Finish your quilt as normal or send it out for quilting.

That’s it you’re done!

Let me know what you think and if you end up trying this quilt block be sure and come back and share a photo on my Facebook page or tag me on Instagram using #scatteredmompatterns.

 

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Yield: Seaside Square Quilt Block

Square in square quilt block tutorial

Square in square quilt block tutorial
Prep Time 1 hour
Active Time 5 hours
Additional Time 7 minutes
Total Time 6 hours 7 minutes
Estimated Cost $20

Materials

  • Several jelly roll strips  (depends on how many quilt blocks/ how big you want your quilt to be. 6 jelly roll strips will make 3 blocks)

Tools

  • Sewing Machine and basic sewing supplies
  • 6.5-inch triangle square up ruler 
  • Rotary Cutter
  • large ruler and large cutting mat
  • Wonder clips
  • Dritz Dual Purpose Marking Pen
  • Walking foot

Instructions

  1. Step 1:  Separate out your strips of fabric and choose how you want them lined up.
  2. Step 2:  Sew the Jelly Roll strips together in sets of 3, using a 1/4 inch seam allowance.  Press seams flat.
  3. Step 3. Trim the up edges on one side.
  4. Step 4: Cut the jelly roll strips into 6.5 inch squares. 
  5. Step 5: Line up 2 squares, right sides together and draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on your jelly roll squares.
  6. Step 6: Sew the two squares together with a straight stitch 1/4 inch on each side of the line.  (a 1/4 inch quilting foot is so handy for this!) 
  7. Step 7: Cut the square in half, along the line you drew.
  8. Step 8: Press seams flat and trim the extra fabric. 
  9. Step 9:  Decide how you want to arrange your new squares.  Depending on your fabric choices, you can get all sorts of looks. 
  10. Step 10:  Once you have fabric squares lined up how you like. Sew the top two blocks together and then the bottom two blocks with a 1/4 inch seam allowance. Then line up the two rows and sew them together.  Press seams flat. 
  11. Step 11: Once you have all your blocks assembled, sew the blocks together to make rows, and then sew the rows together to complete the quilt top

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71 Comments

  1. Looks like you used a background fabric also(white.) It’s not listed in directions.
    You also used the white in the strips but you don’t mention the placement for sewing. I see it but it would help if you examined it.

    1. Actually I said you can use any combo of 3 strips, one of mine happened to be white. If you want to use white, use white if you want to use 3 colors, use 3 colors. There is no background or sashing in this quilt. However I am working on another version that does include sashing.

  2. Hello, I love this pattern, but have never quilted. Should I start with something easier? Also, I have a bunch of fabric squares I love. Could I cut them into strips or is it essential to use the jelly roll? I have never done this, so no idea how difficult this will be. Please let me know if I should choose an easier/more basic pattern. Thank you! Your quilt is beautiful. Regina

    1. Funny you should comment today, I am working on a winter version of this quilt right now.
      This pattern is not terribly difficult, but since there are so many points/seams to match up it does require skill with accurate cutting, accurate 1/4″ seam allowances and proper pinning. (You also need to be careful with the blocks, since they are cut on the bias, they can get “wonky” and throw off your seams.)
      If you’ve NEVER quilted I do however recommend starting with something even simpler. I have a great list of quilt patterns for beginners to check out for inspiration.
      For the seaside squares quilt, you could use yardage cut into 2.5 inch strips, jelly rolls, or even fat quarters cut into strips (you will just get fewer squares.)
      Good luck!

  3. Ellen McCarter says:

    I have been quilting for years. The best tutorial written, yes! very easy to follow. Great job! As soon as I finish 7 UFO’S I will dig out some killer batik and get one started. I will also use this pattern for Wounded Warrior quilts.
    Thanks (don’t have to send mine out though, I have a non computerized midarm)
    Thank you!

  4. Sharon Gratz says:

    This is 2021…….I don’t know when this tutorial was made public, but I’m sure glad it was! Since I’ve ‘aged’ my brain doesn’t seem to stay on track for as long as I would like and I’ve been making quilts in short sessions. This is ideal to kit up for a quilt retreat or to work on at home. With the info you have given in your tutorial, it’s easy to figure out how many strips we would need for any size quilt we would want to make. Thank you for that! Six strips for 3 blocks……..and going through the responses lo and behold I find you gave the size of the block. I love love these colors together. Thank you for sharing.

  5. Sharyl Gray says:

    Question….how many jelly rolls did it take to make a king size quilt?

  6. Have had two quilts quilted by greenfairyquilts.com. Very satisfied with the all over computer controlled patterns.
    Judi Madden, a recognized quilter and one of the owners of the quilt company. is the owner of this service which is offered thru Green Fairy.

  7. Faith DeAngelis says:

    I’m curious if anyone tried white in the middle too. Anyone have a picture of what block might look like. Love working colors around with blocks

  8. Just wanted to thank you for sharing the seaside squares jelly roll pattern. I’ve just completed it with the same fabrics in king sized for myself.
    Thank you thank youI just love it!

  9. When I see my two squares together and then cut them apart. I get two different looking squares. One with white one the outside and the other with white in the centre. Therefore need to make up another set of squares to have two of each type.

  10. Maureen kinville says:

    How do I order this pattern ? I want to make a quilt for a friend just diagnosed with cancer so she can take it to chemo with her.

    1. Thank you so much! It turned out great, didn’t it? Unfortunately, there is no pattern to order. This is just something I came up with on the fly and wrote a tutorial and filmed a quick how-to video about.
      Feel free to capture the post information however you like. Lots of people use the website, printfriendly .com to do that.

      Good luck and prayers for your friend.

  11. Hi I just found this tutorial on Pinterest. Has anyone tried it with the white strip in the middle. Is there is a posting site for project using tutorial?

  12. Jamie, really like the colours in your jelly roll and the way the blocks come together, For those who commented about downloading to pdf they can always download the PrintFriendly app to their browser window, then all it requires is a click on the extension icon and their pdf document is generated for them to save to their PC. I cannot remember who made the first reference to PrintFriendly that caught my eye – that commenter has saved me so much time – no more cutting/copying and pasting the information to a document. Good work and thank you for sharing your successes and failures:).

  13. Karen Zaorski says:

    I do love this quilt tutorial. Also, WOW!, was I surprised to see The Feverish Quilter mentioned in this thread. I also used her to long arm quilt a pattern on a quilt I sewed. She did a really amazing job on my quilt but getting it back to me was a horror story with the emphasis on “story”. I never quite believed the story I got from her about why I didn’t get my quilt back when I was supposed to. The story told was that USPS was at fault but over multiple communications with The Feverish Quilter what I was told sounded very unlikely. This quilt was to be my bridal shower gift for my future d-i-l but it never got to me in time to present it at the shower. I guess I am lucky I finally received it.